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The Elements of a Great Photo

April 5th, 2016

elements of a great photoTaking great photos is a combination of being able to see the world through a camera lens, technique, and pure luck. Every great photo is a result of several elements working together. While sometimes anyone can get lucky and take the perfect photo by chance, you should be aware of these elements and try to make them work in perfect harmony. In this article I’m going to list the most important elements of a great photo.

Subject

The subject is the most important element of any photo. If your photo lacks a subject, it doesn’t matter how technically perfect it is. Without a subject any photo is a snapshot where the viewer doesn’t really get what you wanted to say. Read the rest of this entry »

3 Tips to Shoot Amazing Photos on a Road Trip

March 15th, 2016

road trip photographyRoad trips are great because you get to see such a lot of things and you can stop wherever and whenever you like. They are also a goldmine of opportunities for great photos. In this article we’re going to share with you some simple tips that will help you make your road trip photos simply amazing. Read the rest of this entry »

Tips for Photographing Still Life

March 2nd, 2016

still life photographyHave you ever looked at fabulous still life photos thinking “How did the photographer manage it?”. Still life photography is an art and like any art, it can be mastered. Here are some useful tips to help you get started photographing still life.

Construct the Image

Unlike other photography genres where you are capturing a moment rather than an image, still like photography gives you the luxury of spending as much time as you need to construct your photograph. When shooting still life, you can compose everything – the background, the lighting, the subject or subjects, and arrange things the way you want. So take your time and construct the perfect image before you start shooting. Read the rest of this entry »

The New DropShots iOS App Is Here

December 9th, 2015

Do you use DropShots for iOS? If you’re an iPhone or iPad user, then you should because the app gives you more speed and flexibility than the mobile site.

We’ve just released a new version of the DropShots app that has the following changes:

  • fixed albums layout
  • improved video playback
  • fixed video zooming and occasional crashes reported by some users
  • improved the overall stability of the app

We encourage to download the new version right now and enjoy a better mobile DropShots experience.

3 Tips for Absolute Photography Beginners

December 8th, 2015

photographerSo you’ve decided that photography is “the thing” for you, your point-and-shoot camera has too many limits, and you bought yourself a shiny new dSLR. Congratulations! But if you’ve never used a dSLR camera before, it’s easy to get confused and discouraged. These three tips will help you get started with dSLR photography.

Read Your Camera’s Manual

User manuals are not exactly a great read, but you really should read your camera’s manual. Otherwise you risk missing a lot of your camera’s features and functions (you don’t want to keep using the auto mode, right?). If you find the user manual too boring and you own a popular camera, you can find a book with usage tips and techniques on Amazon. But, I really recommend reading the manual because it’s the best there is and it’s free. Try reading it in chunks and if you’re reading about specific camera features, try to practice them right away to see how things work. Read the rest of this entry »

A Simple Composition Trick to Enhance Your Landscapes

November 30th, 2015
Big Sur Sunset

Big Sur Sunset by Eliza Donovan

Would you like to turn your snapshots into beautiful landscape photos? The difference between snapshots and photography lies in composition (most of the time, snapshots lack it). Although proper composition is not that easy to master and takes lots of practice, there’s a simple trick that will help you transform your photos and make them look a lot better. This trick works for practically any and really helps you compose your shot quickly and easily. It also works as an exercise for mastering composition.

And now the promised trick:

When you are taking landscape photos, get as close to the ground as possible and use the nearest object as a foreground. 

It’s as simple as that. It doesn’t matter if the foreground object is a stalk of dry grass, a mushroom, just sand or anything else. Just make sure you’re right behind the object and you are still picking up the background (dSLR users should use a wide angle lens). Shooting landscapes this way will create a sense of proportion, draw the viewer’s eye to your line of view and give the viewer a sense that he is entering the picture.

This trick works for all landscape subjects, so it won’t be a problem for you to find the scenes to shoot. And don’t forget to share your photos on DropShots!

 

How to Recover Your Photos from a Corrupted SD Card

November 25th, 2015

sd card image recoverySo you’ve inserted your SD cart into your card reader to move new photos to your computer only to see a bunch of file errors and weird file names. The bad news is that your SD card got corrupted. But the good news is that your photos are still there and you can easily recover them without having to buy any software. Read on to find out how.

Why Did My SD Card Get Corrupted?

This is a very common questions that doesn’t have a definite answer. Very often SD cards get corrupted because people eject them from the camera before powering the camera off. Another common reason for SD card failures is poor quality of the cards, so make sure you buy a trusted brand and not the cheapest option if you don’t want to lose your photos. In any case, if the SD card still shows the signs of life, it should be possible to recover your pictures. Read the rest of this entry »

Useful DropShots Privacy Customization Tips to Improve Your Experience

November 20th, 2015

dropshots privacy settingsDropShots have lots of settings and options for making your photo sharing experience just great. We’ve already covered how to edit your photos on DropShots, the formats DropShots supports, using DropShots iPhone app, DropShots navigation and more. Today I’m going to show you how to customize DropShots settings.

DropShots Privacy Settings

I’m sure that a lot of DropShots users simply post photos and videos the way they do on Facebook and don’t check the privacy settings. And that’s a shame because DropShots is very customizable when it comes to your privacy. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Use Negative Space in Your Photography

November 18th, 2015
negative space

by Eliza Donovan

I’m sure you’ve often admired minimalist photos and wondered how the photographer made them look so cool. Most of the time the secret is proper use of negative space. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Delete Duplicates from Photos

November 4th, 2015

delete duplicates from PhotosIf you have OS X Yosemite or El Capitan, most likely you’re using the new Photos app that replaced iPhoto. While Photos has some great Cloud, organizing, sharing and editing features, it still doesn’t have a built-in duplicate finder. And that’s a real shame because most people take several shots of the same subject to get it just right. Plus think of all these resized and touched-up photos. Worse still, not every duplicate finder supports Photos because of the way the app deletes images. Luckily, there are duplicate finders that can delete duplicates from Photos quickly and easily.

If you ask me what sort of a duplicate finder is best for managing images, I’ll say that what you actually need is an image similarity finder because most people have too many similar photos that are not exact duplicates (no, resized photos are not exact duplicates even they are versions of the same image). An app called Duplicate Photo Cleaner recognizes similar images just the way you would and makes it easy to manage your albums and photos on your SD cards. And the best bit is that the Mac version supports Photos. Read the rest of this entry »